Underfloor heating, nice and warm?

Underfloor heating, nice and warm?

Who comes home in the winter wants his or her house to be nice and warm. Underfloor heating is as old as the hills, literally. The Romans were the first to allow adapted underfloor heating in their homes. Over the past few decades underfloor heating has developed to a product that fits well is in a contemporary house and underfloor heating has become increasingly popular. However, not only the development of underfloor heating has continued, bus so does the actual sheel of the building and it’s insulation. Underfloor heating suppliers and installers promote it as ‘comfortable’ and ‘energy efficient’ but is that actually still the case today?

With the Trias Energetica taken into account and an EPC had to go down evenl further in recent years there has been a lot of emphasis on good the insulation of homes. As from January the 1st 2017, the EPC requirement is 0.4 to 0.6 and may already be 0.0 in 2020. Because houses and getting better insulated there wil be little heat disappearing from a property and where the central heating system will be on less often. However several underfloor heating installers have indicated that they regularly were told by their customers that they had to turn up the thermostat a degree higher to aachieve a thermally comfortable indoor climate, than that they did in the past or would have done in a House with radiators. In poorly insulated homes, where the heating system is turned on all day to keep the space at the right temperature, this problem is not experienced. Even though the space is at a constant temperature of about 20 °c in well-insulated homes, the temperature in a room is not percieved to be as thermal snugly than in situations whereby the thermostat is screwed up and with it, perhaps the use of energy. 

On the phenomenon that, underfloor heating in a well-insulated building, the thermostat needs to be one degree higher is still very little known. However the running temperature of the system is still lower as conventional systems, so it will always be more economical. Hypotheses about the cause of the phenomenon are based on guesses and good research is missing. It is therefore important to investigate how a (new build) home is physically been put together and what the effects of applied the heating and ventilation systems are on the thermal comfort of the occupants. By means of the conclusions from such a other potential users of such a system can be informed about the possibilities available on the market. To achieve a comfortable indoor climate without increasing the use od energy, recommendations need to be made for a new design in the application of underfloor heating Edinburgh and will the general knowledge about thermal comfort about various central heating systems be enlarged.

https://www.incognitoheatco.com/underfloorheating/comfort/